Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Bloom Day: May 2013

Spring was off to a slow start. The first few weeks of April still felt and looked like winter in many areas of the United States. Luckily for us in the Northeast, the weather took an excellent turn for the better. The end of April was perfect weather — sunny, 70s, slightly breezy, and no humidity. That perfect week brought us blooming flowers, blossoming fruit trees, greener grass, and unfurling leaves.

Just in time for bloom day, the past weekend in Western Massachusetts was the peak of our spring. Tulips, daffodils, apple trees, cherry trees, forsythia, and lilacs scented the air and colored the landscape.

Here’s a look at the yards, forests, and landscapes surrounding us.

Zan Davies, North Adams, Massachusetts:

Daffodils

Deb Burns, Williamstown, Massachusetts:

 Bleeding hearts

Bloomers

Feral apple trees blooming in woods

Blossoming crabapple tree 

Violets

Debbie Surdam, Hoosick, New York:

Taken last weekend:
Azalea

Forget-me-nots 

Vinca vine

Leanne Curran, Adams, Massachusetts:

Taken along the Thunderbolt Ski Trail on Mount Greylock:

Jack-in-the-pulpit

Painted trilium

Trilium and Bellworts (the nodding yellow bell-shaped flowers)

Winterberry

This forest flower is unknown to us. Can anyone identify it?


Squirrel Corn

Solomon Seal

Kristy Rustay, Lee, Massachusetts:

My daughter, Josslyn, stopping to smell the daffodils
under a weeping cherry tree.

Gwen Steege, Williamstown, Massachusetts:

Crabapple

Dogwood

2 comments:

ilona sherratt said...

Re: Leanne's unnamed spring wildflowers, the small bleeding heart-like white flowers with the frilly leaves are Squirrel Corn. The nodding yellow bell-shaped flowers in the photo with the red trillium are bellworts, and the plant with the small whitish-pink bells is Solomon Seal

Kristy Rustay said...

Thank you to Ilona for identify some of the forest flowers. I updated the post by adding the names to the picture captions. There is still one unidentified blossom. Does anyone know what it is?

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